Saturday, 31 October 2020

Singers Transatlantic Sessions

Jim Lauderdale

Julie Fowlis


Here are a few images of the top singers I’ve been privileged to take photos of, who have sung with the Transatlantic Sessions band at Celtic Connections music festival Glasgow over the past decade. Nothing much beats singing with such a quality band! 

Wonderful memories. 

 

https://www.celticconnections.com


John Paul White

Kris Drever

Cara Dillon
Sierra Hull

Eddi Reader

Karen Matheson

Rachel Sermanni




**Celtic Connections 2021 announced!




**Celtic Connections 2021 announces its first live digital festival from 15th January to 1st February 2021

Offers a unique content online fro the very first time, hoping to reach an even wider audience with special collaborations and workshops.

 

Donald Shaw, artistic director on Folk nights Radio Two, spoke of his long time collaborations  with American Dirk Powell and of the ceilidh bands he grew up with on the Argyll peninsula. Shaw visited Powell when the Transatlantic Sessions played several concerts over in America a few years back. Shaw likes to soak up the ambience of any region and celebrate our differences and also for the festival to engage internationally.

 

Folk music is about the community and is inter-generational. The old plus the new.


Celtic Connections is Europe’s largest winter music festival – welcoming over 2K artists over 300 events. 2021 will be the festivals 28th year with some of the biggest names in Scottish music scene and beyond. The full program will be announced in early December – with some fo the well-known and bets-loved acts that have graced the festival stages.

 




Roots music is always at the heart of the festival that unites with cultures and music world wide. The festival will focus on creating new digital content commissioned projects filmed over some fo Glasgow’s iconic venues. To support and encourage creative industries and to protect Scotland’s rich musical legacy. 

 

A number of international artists will be filmed remotely and added to the line up. Shows will be available for a week .

Funded by Glasgow Life, Creative Scotland and the Scottish government.

https://www.celticconnections.com


Scots – Jamaicans are the forgotten diaspora. Scotland and Jamaica


In 1656 Cromwell shipped 1,200 Scots prisoners of war to Jamaica.

The Scots diaspora which is 28 to 40 million worldwide – share a common ethnic identity or community. Jamaican Scots are part of the Scots Diaspora. 

Many Scots left these shores in the 18th century – Covenanters, Jacobites and during the Highland Clearances. However until the past 20 years 2000 – 2020, there had been no academic studies into Scotland’s part in empire and slavery – Professor Tom Devine, Dr Eric Graham, Dr Stuart Nesbi.  Around 3K slaves went on 31 Scots ships over a 60 year period.

England had established Barbados colony in 1625. (and a British colony until 1966)  From 1790 – 1800, Liverpool cleared 1K slaves. Slave voyages with 1.5 million slaves – The Triangular trade to north America and West Indies, of Chattel slavery on the middle passage: west coast Africa to the new world. 

Chattel slaves had no human rights and could be murdered. Port Glasgow and Greenock records. Slave forts were built on the west coast of Africa. Scotland was a major trader from plantations of tobacco and sugar and cotton. 

Scotland and Caribbean

1740 – 1790 Glasgow was the centre of the Tobacco trade. The Tobacco Lords were Scotland’s richest men and built magnificent townhouses, and in the merchant city. Scotland was a poor country 1690s but by 1850 it was a leading industrial nation. 

Sugar traded for 200 years – with sugar houses in Glasgow from 1667. Scots were plantation owners. India remained mostly of English east India Co until 1801. After the loss of the American colonies in 1775, there was renewed focus in the West Indies.

1711 – 1763 Scots plantations Jamaica.

From 1750 – 1800, over 20 thousand Scots left to seek fortunes in the Caribbean  as doctors, lawyers, merchants, plantation owners, bookkeepers, slave traders and overseers - mostly to Jamaica. Scots originally surveyed Jamaica and set boundaries of slave plantations. Many Jamaican place names are Scots and are descended from Scots.  In 1774 Edward Long estimated that a third of the white population was Scots. 

Scottish Enlightenment figures helped to achieve the Abolition of Slavery abolished 1838. 

In Jamaica today there are many Scots surnames – Campbell, Douglas, Reid, McKenzie, MacDonald, McFarlane, grant, Gordon. Glasgow, Argyle, Dundee, Fort William, Montrose, St. Andrews. Of the names in Greater Kingston a quarter are Scottish.

Naomi Campbell

Jamaica became independent from Britain in 1962. 

In 2009 the Homecoming Scotland  which was a celebration of Scots culture and heritage, organised by Event Scotland and visit Scotland (funded EU) 3m program, 2m marketing. Shockingly in the Booklet mentions of the Jamaican Diaspora were taken out by the then Labour Scottish government.  I remember the major event called the Gathering and I attended one of its major events of a march up the high street by the clans and a tattoo at the castle. We photographers had to run ahead up the Royal mile. Photos below from this occasion. 

Homecoming Scotland 2009

Scotland has a very mixed history – with the tobacco and sugar trade many in Glasgow and Edina became rich, but in the18th century many ordinary Scots suffered under the wars with America and France. The sugar trade was a mainstay of Glasgow’s development for 200 years. 

Many SNP supporters would much prefer to be known as Democrats (the SDP Scottish Democrat Party) and not as nationalists. We must acknowledge our nationalism as international, forward-looking and progressive. It has only been in the past 20 years that there has been recognition in academic study on Scotland’s part in the slave plantations.

One way is by acknowledging the Caribbean, as professor Tom Devine often mentions, as being a large part of the Scots history and Diaspora – a part of our history which has been ignored until recently. Time to change all that. 

MUSIC 2020

 



Christine and the Queens – what style, musicality and joy. Young French singer, who combines melody and funky dance beats. 

 

Bob Dylan’s new album – Rough and Rowdy Ways. His first album of original composition since 

 

Blue Rose Code – New Album - Healing of the Deepest Kind

 

Bandcamp Fridays – when you can contribute all your money to the artists you support.

 

Top 100 albums Rolling Stones

 Includes 

Fleetwood Mac – Rumours

Marvin Gaye – what’s going on Joni Mitchell - Blue

Bob Dylan - Blood on the Tracks





**Celtic Connections 2021 announces its first live digital festival from 15th January to 1st February 2021

Offers a unique content online fro the very first time, hoping to reach an even wider audience. With special collaboration and workshops. Folk music is about the community and is inter-generational. The old plus the new.

Celtic connections is Europe’s largest winter music festival – welcoming over 2K artists over 300 events. 2021 will be the festivals 28th year.- with some of the biggest names in Scottish music scene and beyond. The full program will be announced in early December – with some fo the well-known and bets-loved acts that have graced the festival stages.

 

Roots music is always at the heart of the festival that unites with cultures and music world wide. The festival will focus on creating new digital content commissioned projects filmed over some fo Glasgow’s iconic venues. To support and encourage creative industries and to protect Scotland’s rich musical legacy. 

A number of international artists will be filmed remotely and added to the line up. Shows will be available for a week .

Funded by Glasgow life, creative Scotland and the Scottish government. https://www.celticconnections.com

 

 

We continue to enjoy the entirety and story of the album.

The album, as musician Pat Kane writes – “can contain express and captures a whole imaginary world or a rich slice of their era – and sometimes they can do both at the same time. “