Tuesday, 12 October 2021

Celtic Connections 2022 RETURNS!

 

Transatlantic Sessions


Thrilling to hear that CELTIC CONNECTIONS will return January 20th to 6th Feb, to celebrate its 29th year,  as the world premier winter roots, folk and world music festival. It will be held in Glasgow’s iconic venues.  With over a thousand musicians, and events over 18 days. And is famous for its unique collaborations and connections. The focus this year is on young talent with "Tradovation". 

A bright light of emerging talent with a series of concerts from young acts that seek to find innovation, inspiration and exploration within traditional music.  New commissions from musicians at the forefront of the roots, folk, jazz and orchestral scene in Scotland.


Grit Orchestra


New Talent. The opening concert Neath the Gloaming Star – will mean a great deal , after the lockdown months of this Pandemic.“Celtic Connections 2022’s opening concert is a statement of the festival’s commitment to present and hold up emerging acts, recognising what is being done by young musicians in Scotland and internationally to carry the torch for Scots folk song into the future”, Creative Producer, Donald Shaw, “there’s no doubt that this year’s festival has an added significance to it, and in the context of the last couple of years, we’re eager to capture the collective human experience that is at the heart of what’s been missing for people – the sharing of experiences, songs, music and stories.”

Orchestra. 21 January Skye electronic Celtic fusion band Niteworks joined by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, with Gaelic singers Kathleen MacInnes and Sian, night of commissioned orchestrations.  Capercaillie will be joined by Scottish Symphony Orchestra, led by Greg Lawson in a world premiere of orchestrations of the band’s illustrious back catalogue.

Anniversaries. English folk singer-songwriter Kate Rusby, will celebrate 30 years at Glasgow’s Royal Concert Hall  1 February.   Plus the 20-year anniversary for Quebecois folk quintet Le Vent du Nord, who will bring The Old Fruitmarket to life 28th January with their raucously blend of guitar, fiddle, hurdy gurdy and lusty French vocals. They blend a modern sound, rooted in Celtic music from both Ireland and Brittany, and showcase the festival’s cross-cultural spirit

Indie bands will showcase several gigs, including Twilight Sad at the Old Fruitmarket. Plus the ever popular concerts of the Transatlantic Session and the Roaming Roots Revue.


The festival line up will include Fergus McCreadie, Matt Carmichael, RANT & The Ledger, Kim Carnie, Westward The Light, Hamish Napier & Adam Sutherland, Mairearad Green, Jenn Butterworth, Mike Vass and Charlie Grey & Joseph Peach.

 

** Celtic provides a place of warm cheer with the energy of eclectic, accomplished and enriching roots music for those long, chill January nights and days – that challenge as well as being inspired by the past. Last year the festival was online only which saw over   30K fans worldwide tune in. 

Braebach

 
*Celtic Connections began in 1994, when it offered 66 events at one venue. Since then it’s grown more adventurous, experimental and diverse each year and now offers thousands of events in locations across Glasgow.  Funded by - The Scottish Government Festivals Expo Fund by Caledonian MacBrayne, La Bonne Auberge and Holiday Inn Glasgow Theatreland. The BBC has supported Celtic Connections since its first year and the festival is pleased to collaborate once again with them for 2022.

Rachel Sermanni


Politics today is complex


I read that Norway has nine political parties – (re a letter National). This is complex and there are online questionnaires listing say 30 of the main issues that concern people, and after voters rate the issues that matter to them, they can then decide which party to vote for. Coalition government leads to more consensual, co-operative government and NOT “chaos” as put forward by the English Tories.

Back 19th century it used to be the main concern of the English political parties was raising taxes to fight the French, over territory. Or how to get rich quick. (In the alternative reality, where the Jacobites won, Scotland would be looking for treaties and trade links across Europe. And 250 years ago Burns wrote – of the poison of untold wealth, and how we all deserve equal rights and opportunities. Nothing much changes!)

So this binary two-party, confrontational left or right English political parties, offers too simplistic a choice, with its out-dated first-past-the-post electoral system, that encourages this binary choice.

Meanwhile the English Labour party is seriously spilt between those wanting the elitist status quo and those wanting reform, as the party continues to hark back to the past rather than addressing the pressing issues of the present: and the English Tory party has morphed into Ukip!

The English Tories rather than co-operative, modern government, believe they have to Lord it over others! The Tory word is not its bond either: Johnson only signed the Northern Ireland Protocol to "Get Brexit Done" and get himself re-elected. Most insidiously the British propaganda machine implies an open, fair democracy, when its fairly obvious this isn’t the case.

BoJo claims he wants a high pay Britain by stopping immigration (??) – the real way is by closing private schools and greatly improving education and opportunities for all our children. It appears there is a serious lack of education of both History and Geography generally, never mind Business or Science! In English schools they specialize early to two subjects. In the Scottish system its long been considered important to have a broad education to better understand and have a wider outlook, before any later specialization.

Gerry Hassan writes of a ‘Progressive Alliance” that works seriously for reform of the out-dated UK political system, to get rid of first-past-the-post and embrace a PR (proportional representation) voting system. (This is how Tories can be taken out of government, National Oct 6, 2021) Of course in my view, there is too much tension and strain in this broken system of a “united” Kingdom, of enforcement rather than consent. The English Tories are dismantling democracy and devolution in the UK and working towards ever more destructive centralization. As this Westminster Tory government is not voted for by Scots, this is creating an unsustainable situation.

Today’s Politics is far more complex then in the past - with the environmental crisis, free trade deals, equal rights, security and cyber space, energy supplies, monetary and financial markets, trans rights, child protection, health provision, media and press, education systems, connectivity and infrastructure, industry and business, arts and culture, pandemics, welfare, pensions and social security, economy and tax systems, more I’m sure. Scotland’s independence is not about the English people butabout their out-of-touch ignorant elites.

The words of Burn’s song Scots Wa Hae were not merely about Bruce, but about all freedom fighters against oppression. Kevin McKenna (Its past time to open Pandora’s box) writes of the Tories as ‘extremists’ and of their control of the UK media and Press. Without control of news outlets, many will continue to be fooled by England’s Tory misinformation. And when Scotland gains its independence, we must ban foreign political parties. The biggest issue becomes how can we control the message? “Stronger for Scotland” is not good enough – who is stronger? HOW CAN WE BE “A NATION AGAIN”


Great Britain is a Landmass and not a country

 


 
I found a useful Historic page – GB or Great Britain is NOT a country but a landmass and UK came into being in 1801 when Ireland was brought into the union – and not in 1707.  

I found a useful Historic page – GB or Great Britain is NOT a country but a landmass and UK came into being in 1801 when Ireland was brought into the union – and not in 1707.

 

GB is known as ‘Great’ because it is the largest island in the British Isles and houses the countries of England, Scotland and Wales within its shores.  Great Britain came into use to refer to the island. However, that name had no official significance until 1707, when the island's rival kingdoms of England and Scotland were united as the Kingdom of Great Britain.

 

When was the UK established? Although some people argue that the UK was formed in 1707 by the Act of Union between England, Wales and Scotland, the name United Kingdom wasn’t adopted until 1801 when Ireland was brought into the union.

**The United Kingdom (UK)  The UK is short for The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland… quite a mouthful! It is a sovereign state (in the same way as France or the USA) but is made up of four countries; England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. For Americans, the best analogy would be that the UK is like the USA, whilst its four consistent countries are like states.

There is a long and complicated history that follows the formation of the United Kingdom, but here are the highlights:
c. 925 – The Kingdom of England. Established by the unification of Anglo-Saxon tribes across modern day England.
1536 – Kingdom of England and Wales. A bill enacted by King Henry VIII which effectively made England and Wales the same country, governed by the same laws. Henry Tudor also declared himself King of Ireland in 
1707 – Kingdom of Great Britain. The Kingdom of England (which includes Wales) joined with the Kingdom of Scotland to form The Kingdom of Great Britain.
1801 – United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Ireland joins the union, and once again the name changes.
1922 – United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The Republic of Ireland (Eire, or ‘Southern Ireland’) withdraws from the union, leaving just the northern counties of Ireland. This is the UK that remains to this day.

So when was the UK established? Although some people argue that the UK was formed in 1707 by the Act of Union between England, Wales and Scotland, the name United Kingdom wasn’t adopted until 1801 when Ireland was brought into the union.

Great Britain (sometimes just referred to as ‘Britain’): Great Britain is not a country; it’s a landmass. It is known as ‘Great’ because it is the largest island in the British Isles, and houses the countries of England, Scotland and Wales within its shores.

The name Britain derives from the Roman word Britannia, but there are two conflicting arguments about why the ‘Great’ was stuck on the front of it. The first is that it is used to distinguish Britain from its similar sounding, but much smaller French neighbour, Brittany. The second reason is due to the ego of a certain King James I, who wanted to make it abundantly clear that he wasn’t just the king of the old Roman Britain  (which only included England and some of Wales), but of the entire island; thus he referred to himself as King of Great Britain.

The British Isles:  The British Isles is the name of a group of islands situated off the north western corner of mainland Europe. It is made up of Great Britain, Ireland, The Isle of Man, The Isles of Scilly, The Channel Islands (including Guernsey, Jersey, Sark and Alderney), as well as over 6,000 other smaller islands. It is perhaps understandable then that England is often (although incorrectly) used as a term to describe the whole of the UK.

https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/The-UK-Great-Britain-Whats-the-Difference/

**So there you have it! If you’re still a bit confused over the differences, here’s a quick summary:


The UK – a sovereign state that includes England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.


Great Britain – an island situated off the north west coast of Europe.


British Isles – a collection of over 6,000 islands, of which Great Britain is the largest.


England – a country within the UK.